VR and Space Board grants to Dr. Angela Adamo

Dr. Angela Adamo is a young researcher affiliated with the Stockholm University Astronomy department and the Oskar Klein Centre.  She has recently been awarded two prestigious grants. The first, a Starting Grant from the Swedish Research Council, provides resources to help junior researchers establish themselves. The second is a career grant from the Swedish National Space Board.  These grants will support Dr. Adamo’s position and will allow her to build up a small group formed by a graduate student and a post-doctoral researcher.

A picture of Dr. Angela Adamo in her office
Dr. Angela Adamo

Dr. Adamo’s research uses young star clusters as units of star formation history and stellar feedback in nearby galaxies. Young star clusters contain hundreds of thousands of stars which are gravitationally bound in a space of about 3 light years and which stay bound for hundreds of millions of years. See the image below for an example of a young star cluster in our Milky Way galaxy. Star clusters are a product of the star formation process; they are different than field stars which disperse quickly after they form. Dr. Adamo and her group will investigate the clustering properties of star formation to probe how star formation proceeds from the smallest scales (the size of our solar system) to galactic scales (the size of our Milky Way) in a self-consistent way. The goal is to provide important pieces of observational information that will help to build a consistent picture of galaxy formation and evolution.

This image shows the sparkling centerpiece of Hubble's 25th anniversary tribute. Westerlund 2 is a giant cluster of about 3000 stars located in the our Milky Way galaxy. Hubble's near-infrared imaging camera pierces through the dusty veil enshrouding the stellar nursery, giving astronomers a clear view of the dense concentration of stars in the central cluster.  Dr. Adamo and her group will study similar regions in other galaxies in order to understand the clustering nature of star formation.
This image shows the sparkling centerpiece of Hubble’s 25th anniversary tribute. Westerlund 2 is a giant cluster of about 3000 stars located in the our Milky Way galaxy. Hubble’s near-infrared imaging camera pierces through the dusty veil enshrouding the stellar nursery, giving astronomers a clear view of the dense concentration of stars in the central cluster. Dr. Adamo and her group will study similar regions in other galaxies in order to understand the clustering nature of star formation.

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