The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013

Today’s Nobel Prize awarded jointly to François Englert and Peter W. Higgs “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider”.

Here at OKC we are so delighted to see this prize. It confirms the importance of last year’s discovery of the mechanism and the particle imagined by Englert and Higgs. To tell the truth, although the Higgs particle was only discovered recently it has been part of some of our calculations here at OKC for some time. Some theories of dark matter assume the existence of a Higgs particle. So it was important to confirm this with the ATLAS and CMS experiments, since the discovery we know we are on the right track.
But not until a short time before the discovery annoucement did we really know that the Higgs particle existed. Not so long before the discovery some experimentalists and theorists would get a bit nervous, wondering what would we do if no Higgs particle was found… one would have to start from scratch, change the theory, go back to the drawing board, invent something new but what?

François Englert. Photo: Pnicolet via Wikimedia Commons
Peter W. Higgs. Photo: G-M Greuel via Wikimedia Commons


Thanks to the hard physical discovery of the Higgs particle at CERN we can now move forward, while many other theories without a Higgs particle have faded away into history.
That’s science at work. The Higgs boson is the last missing piece of the so-called standard model of particle physics. Good we got that sorted out!
But we know that the standard model is not the full story, the Higgs particle does not give mass to the neutrinos, nor do we know what is dark matter, as the standard model does not contain any such particles.

The CERN programme with the ATLAS, CMS and LHC experiments is still to provide about 200 times more data than was needed to find the Higgs particle. This is by no mean a guarantee that we will find something new, but it is only by covering new ground with some ingenious new instruments, that there is a chance to learn something new about Nature. The LHC project and the ATLAS and CMS experiments are just fantastic instruments built for that purpose. It is a great privilege to work on the ATLAS experiment and see the Nobel Prize going to particle physics today, after a bit of excitement, here at OKC, we will go back to analysing the data from the ATLAS experiment and see if we can solve another mystery of Nature.

Christophe Clement – researcher at the Oskar Klein Centre

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